Ngala Wongga – cultural significance of languages in the Goldfields by Martine Perret and Jonathan Mustard

Ngala Wongga – cultural significance of languages in the Goldfields by Martine Perret and Jonathan Mustard

On show 4 – 25 Feb  

ARTIST TALK 2pm SATURDAY 11 FEB
A photo exhibition and multimedia projection through floating layers of tulle fabric  with exquisite and rare audio of Aboriginal Elders sharing stories and songs.
Ngala Wongga is an immersive & multi-sensorial installation of sound & image drawing attention to the need to preserve at-risk Indigenous languages in the Goldfields of WA by documenting the last handful of remaining speakers & their physical & cultural connection to their lands.
WE URGE YOU TO LOOK AND LISTEN VIA THIS LINK –

https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/ng-interactive/2016/sep/30/the-survival-of-australias-endangered-languages-an-audio-photo-essay?CMP=share_btn_link

glenys-williams-in-claypan at Wiluna

glenys-williams-in-claypan at Wiluna

Levi & Keneisha in the Claypan. Wiluna. by Martine Perret.

Levi & Keneisha in the Claypan. Wiluna. by Martine Perret.

Salt Lakes near kalgoorlie, goldfields by Martine Perret

Salt Lakes near kalgoorlie, goldfields by Martine Perret

ngala wonnga projection by martine perret

ngala wonnga projection by martine perret

The installation comprises portraiture and aerial photographic images of country to examine the interconnectedness of people with the land. Through multi-exposure layered photography, the portraits and landscapes are woven together as artworks and presented with video projection, alongside the recording of their languages, music and stories.

It is a conceptual body of work designed to reach beyond the pure documentary style typical of modern photojournalism allowing Martine to explore her own creative aesthetics & providing a rare opportunity for viewers to engage with some of the world’s oldest & most endangered languages.

Martine is a French-born, Australian photographer based in Margaret River, WA, whose professional career as a freelance photojournalism took her to Timor-Leste in 2003. For the next decade she worked for the United Nations as a peacekeeping mission photographer documenting life in conflict zones such as Burundi, South Sudan, East Timor, the Democratic Republic of the Congo and most recently in West Africa during the Ebola crisis at the height of the response.

Ngala Wongga is a collaboration between Martine Perret, project producer, photographer and multimedia with digital production technician, video and sound designer Jonathan Mustard.  Field liaison and cultural guidance in the Goldfields by Gary Cooper, the project was supported by Department of Culture and the Arts WA.